User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
fShare
0
Pin It

Relative and Curved Time:
In the literature of Sufism and Islamic spirituality, we read a lot of fantastic stories that apparently look 'imaginary' even to physicists who are familiar with the theory of Relativity and the concepts such as time travel that we have seen in section I.9. Ibn ‘Arabî refers to the relativity of time in many direct and indirect ways. He explicitly says: 'minutes are years while sleeping' [IV.337.1]. But 'sleeping' here does not necessarily mean usual sleep, it could be any state of imagination or realization that momentarily isolates the Sufi from witnessing the visible world while his spirit is occupied with other dimensions of being. For example, he speaks in chapter 73 of the Futûhât about the 300 spiritual knowers (s. ‘ârif) 'whose hearts are like the heart of Adam'. There he says that:
If a knower (of those 300) is taken (to witness) one scene of the Lord's scenes (al-mashâhid al-rubûbiyya), he receives in one of its 'days' (i.e., 'the Lord's Day', which equals a thousand earthly years, 22:47) at that moment (when he is taken to the Lord's scene) divine knowledge (equivalent to) what others get in the world of (normal) senses in one thousand normal years with hard work and preparation. So this is how the divine knowledge that anyone from among those three hundred achieves when he is taken out of his own (carnal) soul and is confined in one Lord's Day. The person who can appreciate what we have said is only whoever has tasted that, when (normal) time was folded up (tayy) for him in that moment, just as distance and other quantities are folded up for the eyesight whenever someone opens his eye and looks at the orb of fixed stars: at the same time when he opens his eye, the rays (of his eyesight) are connected with the bodies of these stars. So look how big is this distance and this velocity (of our normal eyesight, in that case)!
[II.9.23]

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
fShare
0
Pin It

Motion:
Time, therefore, is necessary to describe motion. But the answer to the question 'what is motion?' may not be as obvious as it might at first appear. Matter is in continuous motion, and objects require a cause to move; this is undisputable philosophical fact. But the basic issue in the philosophy of motion is whether the matter-in-motion can be itself the cause of its motion? The dialectical explanation considers that matter is the most primary source of the development of completion, and therefore it can be itself the cause and subject of motion. Metaphysical philosophy, on the other hand, insists on differentiating between that which moves and the mover. This is because motion is a gradual development and completion of a deficient thing, which can not by itself develop and complete gradually—and therefore can not be the cause of completion.

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
fShare
0
Pin It

Space-Time and the Speed of Light:
 Although time does not appear to be like space, in the theory of Relativity it is treated as a real dimension just like any one of the other three dimensions of space (length, width, depth : x, y, z). In Relativity, as we explained in the preceding chapter, any point in the universe can be expressed in terms of its 4-dimensional space-time coordinates (x, y, z, t); we do not have time alone or space alone, but a single field called space-time.[1]
 Likewise, Ibn ‘Arabî describes the physical universe as something that 'is confined in time and space' [I.121.22]. Furthermore, one of the most important results of Ibn ‘Arabî's view of time is that he considers that we are living in 'Saturday', while the other six cosmic 'Days' from Sunday to Friday account for the creation of the world—which is now continuously being re-created by Allah (see also section V.6)—in space. Allah creates the three-dimensional world (actually six-dimensional/directional if we consider the two directions of each dimension) in six 'Days' from Sunday to Friday, but we human beings witness only Saturday because in the other six days of the week we (along with the rest of creation) are still being created. Ibn ‘Arabî insists that this divine creative process is repeated every single moment as we shall explain in the following chapters.

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
fShare
0
Pin It

The Origin of Time?
If we can not speak about the origin of the world in time, we can still ask about the origin of time in the world. As Ibn ‘Arabî pointed out, we can not ask when time began, because the word 'when' requires time to be defined beforehand. But we can ask how did time begin?
 In response to this cosmological question, Ibn ‘Arabî argues that both the natural and para-natural types of time have originated in the Universal Soul which has two forces: the active and intellective (quwwa ‘amaliyya and quwwa ‘ilmiyya). The active force is in charge of moving bodies and objects,[1] while the intellective force is capable of perceiving knowledge, or updating the soul's spiritual state. So physical time (i.e. that is associated with physical objects) is that in which bodies keep moving to preserve their existence, and spiritual time is that in which the human being's Heart perceives knowledge from his Lord [Ayyâm Al-Sha’n: 6]. Physical time, therefore, is originated from the active force of the Universal Soul, while spiritual time originates from its intellective force [Ayyâm Al-Sha’n: 7].