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DUALITY OF TIME:

Complex-Time Geometry and Perpetual Creation of Space

by Mohamed Haj Yousef



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2.9  European Renaissance


Following the Middle Ages, the Renaissance started in Italy in the 13th century after series of famines and plagues that reduced the population to around half of what it was before the calamities. Despite these crises, there was some noticeable progress as the interest in ancient philosophy resumed when many Byzantine scholars had to seek refuge in the West when Constantinople was conquered by the Ottomans in 1453. After appreciating the Greek and Arab learning systems, arts and sciences started to flourish, especially following the invention of printing in the 14th century, which allowed faster propagation of literature. Science and art were initially mingled, with artists such as Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519 AD) making observational drawings of anatomy and nature.

By the 15th century, with the discovery of the New World by Christopher Columbus in 1492, the Aristotelean classical view of the world had been challenged, and people started to question the previously sacred theological truths, searching for more reasonable answers. This led Francis Bacon (1561-1626) to develop the philosophical basis of the modern scientific method, starting from his belief in the right of man to dominate nature: “to bind her to your service and make her your slave” Jardins (2012).

However, although this boosted the spirit of exploration, with Columbus arriving in America and Magellan sailing around the tip of South America, it was sadly accompanied by the tragic abolishment of much of the historical and cultural heritage of these countries that were invaded by the Europeans, who believed that non-Christian cultures were worthless. This resulted in the complete destruction of Central American civilizations and greatly affected many other countries in Asia and Africa.

Nevertheless, during the Renaissance period, Europeans started to invent their own learning system and philosophy, especially after Martin Luther dared to question the authority of the Catholic church on scriptural matters, which was followed by the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century.



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Message from the Author:

I have no doubt that this is the most significant discovery in the history of mathematics, physics and philosophy, ever!

By revealing the mystery of the connection between discreteness and contintuity, this novel understanding of the complex (time-time) geometry, will cause a paradigm shift in our knowledge of the fundamental nature of the cosmos and its corporeal and incorporeal structures.

Enjoy reading...

Mohamed Haj Yousef


Check this detailed video presentation on "Deriving the Principles of Special, General and Quantum Relativity Based on the Single Monad Model Cosmos and Duality of Time Theory".

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Because He loves beauty, Allah invented the World with ultimate perfection, and since He is the All-Beautiful, He loved none but His own Essence. But He also liked to see Himself reflected outwardly, so He created (the entities of) the World according to the form of His own Beauty, and He looked at them, and He loved these confined forms. Hence, the Magnificent made the absolute beauty --routing in the whole World-- projected into confined beautiful patterns that may diverge in their relative degrees of brilliance and grace.
paraphrased from: Ibn al-Arabi [The Meccan Revelations: IV.269.18 - trans. Mohamed Haj Yousef]
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